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20130104
20130104
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
, i know that the chief and i and supervisor cohen and dr. campbell and the whole public health staff have always had dialogue and been concerned especially when there is an uptick in june of this year on violent crime and homicides in san francisco. and, so, we've been working together on creating a program which i announced some months ago, the ipo program, the ability to work on things that would interrupt and intervene earlier in the behavior patterns of people that would be both victims and perpetrators of violent crime in our city. to support the police department and law enforcement system of doing more predictive policing using both data and technology to help us do that. and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and
engaged in a conferring with michael cohen who was then working at the office of economic and workforce development at financing tools that could help us revitalize the water front. and michael cohen mentioned that he was in conversation with david mad way about different option whether redevelopment would be an appropriate tool along the water front or if there was another option and david mad way who's here, is former general counsel of the san francisco redevelopment agency and now works at shepherdmony and point out an object cures area in the california code and so it was really david's idea that we have been plowing over the last eight years and i want to thank mr. mad way for that brilliant stroke >>> we are the ones who make sense -- david you know the poorliment tree rules better than anyone. come to the mic afterwards so it can be recorded. >> thank you joovment elane knobs port staff and as david said this is putting the law in place and geek getting the mechanism to secure infrastructure financing proceeds and a lot of credit goes to bran son and many of my preed says c
. campbell. >> good afternoon, mayor lee, supervisor cohen, chief suhr, members of the press. my name is dr. andrei campbell and i've worked at san francisco general hospital for the past 19 years as a trauma surgeon. before i came to san francisco i worked in new york. i have 24 years of experience of caring for victims in two major cities in our great country. this week all of us have watched with horror the events in newtown, connecticut, with great sadness as we learned the devastation that one person brought on that quiet community. i've seen the devastation that guns have visited on victims of crime. my heart goes out to all the victims and their families as they struggle to understand what has happened over the last week. san francisco general hospital is the only trauma center in the city and county of san francisco and in the u.s. it is, in fact, i think, the best trauma center in the united states. we stand ready 24/7 to care for any injured patient in the city and county of san francisco. we also at general hospital are caring for uninsured and underinsured people who come in aft
we have this area first up. supervisors com poems and cohen joined the meeting. we got a lot of feedback. most of it constructive. and we'll be working over the next few months. we'll have follow-up meetings, late winter, early spring and hopefully have a proposal for you probably some time in the spring we hope will receiptv a consensus from the community -- front community to manage needs in that area. hopefully good progress in that front. >>> in the spirit of free muni, a small gesture of -- well, two things. first, as we do every year on new year's eve, we'll be providing free muni service from 8:00 p.m. till 6:00 a.m. to make sure that everybody can get around safely and unimpaired. at least those operating vehicles will be unimpaired and we'll help everybody else get to where they need to go. there is a fire works show at the embarcadaro and mission at midnight. and we want people to be able to travel safely. we're working with the police department and other departments to make sure everybody is safe. and along the lines of free, you'll have on your agenda today, i th
. the interesting thing -- i was having this conversation with supervisor cohen yesterday -- is that the unfortunate thing is that what we have seen is an effort to pit, you know, doing something to provide access to low-income youth against the very important goal of actually funding maintenance for the mta. the two are not mutually exclusive and, in fact, the program that's before you, the funding that's before you recognizes that to increase access to transportation, you have to do both. and as director rifkin said, this funding proposal allows you to not only fund this pilot program, which is why -- one of the reasons that the mtc gave you this funding, but also allows you to meet the maintenance need that all of us should be addressed. you know, you don't have to choose between helping low-income youth and actually making the system work. i do believe that that is a false choice, and i think that we can walk and chiu gum at the same time. i think that it is in the interest of these youth that we have a system that works. but a system that works will not be meeting the needs of low-income famili
'll be surprised, i have to do this publicly, supervisor malia cohen came by and helped the process along. anybody knows her, she jumped into things, it was a rainy day, i have to thank the public, they were very, very patient, amazingly patient standing outside in those lines and then coming in inside the rain, they stood there until we got every firearm processed. this was one of those unique things where it was, you know, the factors you like to see involved. a private donor who put up the first part of the money, a community organization and law enforcement. and the next part of it happened on both sides of the bay. i mean i know captain joiner in oakland said it was the first time he had ever seen this kind of collaborative effort between -- for this particular purpose. the fact that it was going on, on both sides of the bay at the same time and both of us accomplishing way more than we hoped to do was just an amazing thing. and then, chief, i got to thank you for those. at some point the grant money that we had ran out and i was going to go out and tell everybody to go home. but you sa
said you shouldn't cancel that project. can you work with us? michael cohen phoned me up the next day. can we cut $40 million out of this project? it was one person more responsible than any others, it's tony irons, was the architect that was responsible for the revitalization of city hall who came to my office and said, we cannot abandon this. we can't walk away from this project. we have an opportunity to really take a lot of our values and principles, particularly raising the bar as we did as a city on our green building standards, mandating the most aggressive green building standards for private construction anywhere in the united states. and showcasing them in this new building. >> the city for the sfpuc, it was critical that the building stay as a lead building. the easiest thing to do to cut out millions of dollars, let's just go from lead platinum to lead gold. but that wasn't the objective. this needed to be the best example of energy conservation of any office building in the united states. >> we became involved in the san francisco public utilities headquarter project duri
activity. the yellow states have local activity. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us now. this has been a bad season. i call it the whoop, when i hear that cough, i go you got the whoop. >> and you get away as quuckly as possible. >> you smile and back out of the room. >> how bad has the flu season been? >> it's been one of the worst flu seasons in the past decade, maybe only two or three has been as bad as this year. flu can hit early, like in november, december, which is what happened this year, or it can hit later, like january, february, or even later like march and so this has been a really early flu season. not a terrible flu season, but an early flu season. >> now, because it's so early, does that give us any indication how bad it will get? >> i was talking to folks at the cdc last night, and they said, look, we think it will be a moderate to severe season overall. so, worse than last year but not as bad as some other years. >> when i hear that whoop somewhere in this building -- >> i heard it many times in this building. >> i think i didn't get a flu shot. is
at this. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us from one of the southern states in atlanta. i hope you are feeling okay to do the segment. >> i can't even tell you how many people who i know who were sick with flu or flu-like illness. >> including me. >> and you're up there. >> and i'm up here and i didn't get the flu shot and i don't get it every year. >> ashleigh, did i teach you nothing? >> do you know what, you're brilliant and i'm busy. >> you're very sweet. next year i'm flying up there. >> just how bad is it? is it any different, i always say it's so bad this year, i feel like i say the same story every year. is it something different? is the strain different? >> no, what is weird or a little different is it started early. when you look at the past ten years, there were only two, maybe three seasons where we saw this much flu this early and it kept growing and growing. so, the cdc just a couple of hours ago came out with new numbers i'll share with you, ashleigh, if you look at last week, there were 29 states that had high levels of flu. the week before th
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)